What People Are Saying

  • I ran across your blog hours ago and have not been able to stop clicking links all over the site.  I added a comment to the blog, and kept on reading.  What a wonderful site; I particularly like how you captured so many of the emotional battles that surround aging, transition to a senior community and more.
  • The description of your living in the nursing home is powerful and effective.
  • I love this idea!
  • This is great….urban living is where it’s at!
  • This is Great!!!!  I am so excited to follow yours and your sons experience!!
  • It is certainly good to think outside the box and inspire creative new ideas. Perhaps when people suggested the first Assisted Livings and Adult Day Care as alternatives to nursing homes, others said "that will never work." It is always easier to tear down a new idea than to suggest one! Keep on dreaming up new things!
  • I appreciate all the work you’re doing to alter perceptions and effect change.
  • With individuals such as yourself battling it out, perhaps things will change.
  • As someone who has actually contemplated the live-in experiment that you undertook, I found your insights from that experience VERY interesting and right on point.
  • Since I am very familiar with culture change – having read a lot and also having participated as a “community champion” during the culture change initiative at a large CCRC – I thought I knew exactly what you were going to say in your presentation.  You surprised me, though.  Your insights were fresh and helped me to deepen my ability to look at things from the resident’s perspective – I was particularly interested in your comments about the majority of caregiving being done by residents to other residents, rather than by staff to residents.
  • Your talk really inspired, sensitized and prepared me in so many ways and I THANK YOU! You also made some excellent points and really got me thinking about age segregation and what I can do to bridge that gap. Much appreciated!
  • Having viewed your website several times (including just now), allow me to offer that I believe you are doing something that is courageous and important.  Whether it makes good business is less important than the value of your journey, and your reportage on the experiences. 
  • Your talk at Vinson Hall was excellent.  It left me with much to think about and an altered perspective.  I was seated in the overflow room and can tell you that you maintained the rapt attention of everyone there—no small feat.
  • What a great idea, Steve. I have really enjoyed your video blogs and website
  • I really have enjoyed your blog and found it most helpful not only for my clients but also for myself
  • I can say that your blog and video while at Paul Spring is one that I truly looked forward to receiving each day.  It’s been helpful already as I work with my clients living in a comparable communities for me to have a better insight into their experience through yours.  Thanks so much for doing this on behalf of all of us whose passion it is to work with older adults.
  • I just wanted to congratulate you on taking on this challenge.  I’m sure hearing about your experience will definitely be helpful to many people.
  • I think what you’re doing is great! I have always wanted to give it a try ‘incognito’ ! I will look forward to hear how it goes.
  • what a great way to further understanding of the transition process faced by many seniors.  We look forward to following your progress.
  • Will continue to follow your exploits.  Seniors are the biggest under-utilized resource in this country.  Mine them for knowledge! They’re fantastic and can regale you for hours with their histories and accomplishments!  You’ll come home a changed man.  It will be interesting to see your take on ageism once you’ve experienced it first-hand.
  • What I want to know is, “How’s the wife taking this??”
  • Great concept. More power to you. Life is a journey and aging should be its celebration.
  • You’re doing your part. While I admire your amazing dedication to your work, you must be a little nuts.  Hope it’s an enjoyable and informative experience!  I know you’ll keep us informed.
  • Terrific documentation and a great example from your childhood, when you were so fragile and dependent on your parents.  Same thing at 83, fragile and dependent on others.  Great comparison.
  • If you need a coupon for Depends let me know!
  • this is a very innovative thing you are doing… WOW! I’m impressed.
  • what a great idea to truly experience what we guide people through every day!  I am really enjoying the blogs and it gives me real insight to assist those in this transition.
  • You are nuts!
  • I am huge fan of what you’re doing! I loved your analogy to going to school in your last post. I always think about the first day of school when I have a new resident move to my assisted living community
  • Good on you for arranging this life change!  What a brilliant idea.  You show dedication, commitment, professionalism, and (most critical) vision and imagination.  You provide a kind of leadership for seniors and senior living that is extraordinary. 
  • I wanted to tell you how much I admire your willingness to embrace the retirement community living experience. As you noted, you will not have the exact same experience as a senior leaving his/her home, but you will be tasting the retirement life.
  • What an awesome step you are taking to learn first-hand what is truly feels like for our clients.  I wish you well. 🙂
  • What a FANTASTIC idea you have!! You are the real deal, and I’m most impressed.
  • The transitional points you hit on are right on the mark, and as professionals in the industry, we need to experience them in order to truly understand them.
  • Nice idea.  But if you really want to feel the dislocation, discomfort and feeling of terror, spend a few nights in a nursing home, totally dependent on someone else to help you eat, ambulate and go to the bathroom.  And then go over and over in your mind, $10,000.00 per month.  Then you will really be able to understand what families go through.
  • I was thinking about what you said yesterday about the "state" that our elders live in and how we should put ourselves in their shoes and see how we would feel if we lived in some of these rehab centers, communities, etc.  I’ve been wondering why all the rehab centers look the same…gray or yellowed walls and dingy floors.  We should start a community service program with volunteers from high schools to paint those dingy walls; create some art and hang it up…
  • I just wanted to say how fantastic your adventure sounds, and suspect it will only enhance to good work you do in our community.