ProAging Email Network Newsletter January 5, 2006

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ProAging Email Network Newsletter January 5, 2006

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in this issue
— Transportation (and networking!) key topic at next weeks ProAging Meeting
— Food industry needs to wake up to coming wave of senior citizens
— Age-Friendly Fitness Centers and Wellness Programs Attract Older Adults
— A push for stay-at-home healthcare
— Caregivers need some TLC, too
— Moving parent to long-term care an emotional issue
— People on the Move – HOSPICE OF THE CHESAPEAKE ANNOUNCES NEW HIRES
— SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR – The Piano Man

Dear steve,


Transportation (and networking!) key topic at next weeks ProAging Meeting

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Hear local experts speak on the challenges and resources available for transportation in N. Virginia. As always ProAging meetings are invaluable networking opportunities – so bring plenty of business cards and brochures.
PROAGING/IAC MEETING
Date: 1/12/2006
Time: 2-4 p.m.
Location: Fairfax County Govt Center – Conference Rooms 4&5 12000 Government Center Pkwy
Fairfax, VA 22035

Hear local experts speak on the challenges and resources available for transportation in N. Virginia. As always ProAging meetings are invaluable networking opportunities – so bring plenty of business cards and brochures.Date: 1/12/2006Time: 2-4 p.m.Location: Fairfax County Govt Center – Conference Rooms 4&5 12000 Government Center PkwyFairfax, VA 22035Contact: Steve Gurney
Phone Number: 703-992-1118
Email Address: sgurney@gwpi.net
Full event calendar for other regional events


Food industry needs to wake up to coming wave of senior citizens

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Big-box supermarkets, dimly lit restaurants, grocery packaging bearing tiny lettering – these are but a few issues the food industry must begin addressing as the Canadian population ages. “I don’t think any of these industries are looking very far ahead to the greying of society,” says Richard Loreto, who specializes in demographic trends in Canada and the U.S. and the implications for consumer products and services.Read on…

Big-box supermarkets, dimly lit restaurants, grocery packaging bearing tiny lettering – these are but a few issues the food industry must begin addressing as the Canadian population ages. “I don’t think any of these industries are looking very far ahead to the greying of society,” says Richard Loreto, who specializes in demographic trends in Canada and the U.S. and the implications for consumer products and services.


Age-Friendly Fitness Centers and Wellness Programs Attract Older Adults

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Physical activity is the well-documented solution to maintaining the quality of life for adults 50 years and older. Yet, with the low amount of exercise participation among adults in general, is it worthwhile for organizations serving older adults to expand their activity and wellness programs? A resounding “yes” is the opinion of 497 active-aging businesses responding to a new International Council on Active Aging (ICAA) survey. A nearly unanimous 95% said having a fitness or wellness center or a physical activity program targeting older adults attracted more residents or members. And 93% said these programs retained their clients.Read on…

Physical activity is the well-documented solution to maintaining the quality of life for adults 50 years and older. Yet, with the low amount of exercise participation among adults in general, is it worthwhile for organizations serving older adults to expand their activity and wellness programs? A resounding “yes” is the opinion of 497 active-aging businesses responding to a new International Council on Active Aging (ICAA) survey. A nearly unanimous 95% said having a fitness or wellness center or a physical activity program targeting older adults attracted more residents or members. And 93% said these programs retained their clients.


A push for stay-at-home healthcare

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Kathy Bessette has lived in the same modest home her husband remodeled 34 years ago, building memories as she watched nine children grow. So when the widow began to require long-term care, she was determined not to let Medicaid push her into a nursing home. With the help of home care providers, an adult day program, and an emergency- response device fastened around her wrist, she stayed put.Read on…

Kathy Bessette has lived in the same modest home her husband remodeled 34 years ago, building memories as she watched nine children grow. So when the widow began to require long-term care, she was determined not to let Medicaid push her into a nursing home. With the help of home care providers, an adult day program, and an emergency- response device fastened around her wrist, she stayed put.


Caregivers need some TLC, too

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People who choose to embrace the life of a caregiver tend to have one thing in common, experts say. They accept the sacrifice and hardship, and most of all, the self-denial that goes with it. But that may be a mistake, experts say. And if shouldering that burden successfully carries one message, it’s this one: “Take care of yourself,” said Rhonda Dahlbert, clinical manager for SSM Hospice in St. Louis. “Don’t ever lose focus of what you need to do for yourself to stay healthy. Reach out. Don’t be afraid to ask for help.”Read on…

People who choose to embrace the life of a caregiver tend to have one thing in common, experts say. They accept the sacrifice and hardship, and most of all, the self-denial that goes with it. But that may be a mistake, experts say. And if shouldering that burden successfully carries one message, it’s this one: “Take care of yourself,” said Rhonda Dahlbert, clinical manager for SSM Hospice in St. Louis. “Don’t ever lose focus of what you need to do for yourself to stay healthy. Reach out. Don’t be afraid to ask for help.”


Moving parent to long-term care an emotional issue

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Dear Dr. LeCrone: My siblings and I have decided the time has come to move my elderly and frail mother into a nursing home. She is living at home by herself, and her doctor has said she can no longer take care of herself. Her memory is failing, she has fallen and injured herself twice, and she is no longer capable of making many of the decisions necessary for independent living. She has said for years she never wants to leave her home of 50-plus years and “wants to die at home.” This move is probably going to be traumatic for her and the rest of the family. Is there anything you can suggest to help make this situation better?Read on…

Dear Dr. LeCrone: My siblings and I have decided the time has come to move my elderly and frail mother into a nursing home. She is living at home by herself, and her doctor has said she can no longer take care of herself. Her memory is failing, she has fallen and injured herself twice, and she is no longer capable of making many of the decisions necessary for independent living. She has said for years she never wants to leave her home of 50-plus years and “wants to die at home.” This move is probably going to be traumatic for her and the rest of the family. Is there anything you can suggest to help make this situation better?


People on the Move – HOSPICE OF THE CHESAPEAKE ANNOUNCES NEW HIRES

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Hospice of the Chesapeake announces the recent additions to their staff Terry Graybill, RN of Glen Burnie and Susan Coale, LCSW-C of Arnold. Terry Graybill, RN, was hired as a Community Nurse Educator who serves as a liaison with the medical community. Ms. Graybill has more than 30 years of nursing experience including emergency room nursing. She worked for Anne Arundel School Health Services for five years as a school nurse and then as a health educator for the staff. Her last position was as a Medical Program Manager for Almost Family Adult Day Care in Pasadena. Graybill received her nursing degree from the Emanuel Hospital School of Nursing in 1972. Susan Coale, LCSW-C was hired as a bereavement counselor with the organization’s Spiritual and Bereavement Care Center. Ms. Coale came to Hospice of the Chesapeake from Gloria Dei! Lutheran Church in Arnold, where she served as the Parish Counselor for eight years. She has also worked at Union Memorial Hospital and in Child Protective Services before entering private practice as a psychotherapist at Chesapeake Comprehensive Counseling Center in 1987. Ms. Coale has been a volunteer for Hospice of the Chesapeake since 1987 as a member of the Professional Advisory Group and of the Ethics Committee. She facilitated the children’s bereavement weekend, Camp Nabe, since its inception. She assisted in the development and implementation of the teen bereavement weekend, Phoenix Rising and the adult bereavement weekend, Wabanaki Retreat. Ms. Coale holds a bachelor’s degree in Sociology from Western Maryland College and a master’s degree in Social Work from University of Maryland.

Hospice of the Chesapeake announces the recent additions to their staff Terry Graybill, RN of Glen Burnie and Susan Coale, LCSW-C of Arnold. Terry Graybill, RN, was hired as a Community Nurse Educator who serves as a liaison with the medical community. Ms. Graybill has more than 30 years of nursing experience including emergency room nursing. She worked for Anne Arundel School Health Services for five years as a school nurse and then as a health educator for the staff. Her last position was as a Medical Program Manager for Almost Family Adult Day Care in Pasadena. Graybill received her nursing degree from the Emanuel Hospital School of Nursing in 1972. Susan Coale, LCSW-C was hired as a bereavement counselor with the organization’s Spiritual and Bereavement Care Center. Ms. Coale came to Hospice of the Chesapeake from Gloria Dei! Lutheran Church in Arnold, where she served as the Parish Counselor for eight years. She has also worked at Union Memorial Hospital and in Child Protective Services before entering private practice as a psychotherapist at Chesapeake Comprehensive Counseling Center in 1987. Ms. Coale has been a volunteer for Hospice of the Chesapeake since 1987 as a member of the Professional Advisory Group and of the Ethics Committee. She facilitated the children’s bereavement weekend, Camp Nabe, since its inception. She assisted in the development and implementation of the teen bereavement weekend, Phoenix Rising and the adult bereavement weekend, Wabanaki Retreat. Ms. Coale holds a bachelor’s degree in Sociology from Western Maryland College and a master’s degree in Social Work from University of Maryland.


SUPPORT OUR SPONSOR – The Piano Man

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THE PIANO MAN entertains at communities like yours in Washington, Maryland, and Virginia. Your piano or his portable. Residents sing along, play “Name That Tune” and make song requests — everything popular from 1905 to 2005. Available 7 days/week including holidays.E-mail ThePianoManDC@earthlink.net or call (202) 966-8000.

THE PIANO MAN entertains at communities like yours in Washington, Maryland, and Virginia. Your piano or his portable. Residents sing along, play “Name That Tune” and make song requests — everything popular from 1905 to 2005. Available 7 days/week including holidays.E-mail ThePianoManDC@earthlink.net or call (202) 966-8000.Read on…


Quick Links…

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  • ProAging Website
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  • Guide to Retirement Living Site
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