What Home Upgrades Don’t Cost a Lot?

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 By Robin Jenks Vanderlip, BA, MC, CMRS, SRES, LUX, Professional Realtor

A “good upgrade” is a change that is not too expensive and makes the house look great. Some examples include:

1. Paint your cabinets. This can have amazing results when done right. Choose your color wisely. Earth and neutral tones are best. Use the proper paint and take your time.

2. Change or add hardware and fixtures. Oil rubbed bronze is all the rage, and brushed stainless steel looks very expensive. Tip: try to keep the same hardware throughout the house. At the very least, keep the same hardware within a room.

3. Apply fresh paint throughout. Walls, doors, ceilings and trim should all be freshly painted. Use the recommended colors that match in color samples. They are professionally blended to make your home look awesome. You can also add a pop of color to make you feel good.
Choose colors to boost your mood and energy.

4. Make your front door a focal point. Doors should be cheerful, clean and clutter free. Hardware should look nice, and the front lamp should be working. Painting the door and updating the fixture can make a big difference and set your house apart from the neighbors.

5. Have carpets cleaned or replaced. New textiles used in the production of carpet provide insulation and fewer chemicals in your home. Also look into tile, laminate and other materials like bamboo. The change will be amazing.

6. Take an honest look at your bathroom. Re-caulk, re-surface, re-grout, and replace your toilet seat. New towels and throw rugs can transform the bathroom.

We all tend to keep our home as it was when we moved in. Over the years, we maintain the same decorations, colors, and stuff in the same places. When making small changes and upgrades, the energy shifts in the house and that is good for our mood and our frame of mind.

A good upgrade will make your house more in line with current trends and market expectations. Done correctly, home upgrades can give a house new energy, while improving both form and function.

In the next issue, I will be writing about what to keep and what to get rid of in “The Basics of De-cluttering.”

Robin Jenks Vanderlip

Please email me
([email protected]) with your questions, comments and future topics you would like to hear about.

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